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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
with countries around the world in deeper trade, investment in science and technology, development, all efforts that can spark economic growth for all of our people. such efforts depend on a spirit of mutual interest and mutual respect. no government or company, no school will be confident working in a country where its people are endangered. four partnerships to be affective, our citizens must be secured and our efforts must be welcomed. a politics based only on anger, one based on dividing the world between us and them, if it ultimately undermines those who tolerate it. all of us have an interest in standing up to those forces. let us remember that muslims have suffered the most at the hands of extremism. on the same day our civilians were killed and in benghazi a turkish police officer was killed days before his wedding. several afghan children were more by their parents just days after they were killed by a suicide bomber in kabul. it may initially be focused on the west, but over time it cannot be contained. the same impulses of extremism is used to justify war between tribes and clans. it
scouting out locations or a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." this is about 30 minutes. >> if we could have everybody in the back come on up that's going to join us. thank you so much for your patience. the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block was around as. apparently -- thank you. people are nodding, so that's good. thank you very much. there may be some people still held up and we will welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter earnest, executive director and i'll ask you as a courtesy, to those for recording the program and to the speakers, the kind enough to turn off your cell phones, pdas and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. well, it's wonderful to see all of you here for the signing, and as we kick off the signing, i will show you a clip of the film based on the book for which you came to attempt the signing. so with that said we will go right ahead and come up and do the interview with tony. >> [inaudible] >> has shocked the civilized world. more than 60 american citizens continue to be held as hostages. >> six
a history degree over a computer science degree. there has to be more rewards for the need in america or the jobs are going to start going abroad faster and faster, high paying jobs. there's no specific plan to get that done. >> all right. that's got to be the last word. all right. did you catch who these guys are talking about? >> that man is working hard for you. >> a true hero. >> you're lucky to have a guy so bright and so capable and committed. my friend, and a true patriot. >> well, obviously, they're referring to none other than our neil cavuto covering the debates like no one else starting this wednesday live from denver, kicking off on fox news at 4 p.m. eastern and neil gets the biggest and brightest players, so, watch it and profit. before the first presidential debate. neil talks to the republican vice-presidential nominee. >> you mentioned bowles simpson, sir, and you voted against that, so, your critics say-- >> i like that part of bowls simpson. the critics say you talk a good game and you don't deliver the goods. what do you say? >> will paul ryan's answer be to fix it
science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations he has for himself. but look, i think part of that was because as i said earlier, we met a new mitt romney, we met a mitt romney that wanted to walk away from the central theory of his economic plan, which was his tax cut. i don't have a tax plan that is 4.8 trillion, i am not going to cut taxes on the rich. i don't have a voucher plan, i love teachers, i think we need more of them. don't believe me, speaker gingrich was eloquent in the primaries, saying that mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. >> the president had 90 minutes, now, if he had done his homework and prepared, if he had actually studied romney, why didn't he say it? virtually every analyst has said, and even your deputy campaign manager has said the charges -- was made wrong. forgetting that for a second, the job of the president is supposed to be able to be competent and to stand up for what he believes in and articulate what is wrong. mitt romney walked over him. >> and alex, you mentioned the president is air born to the golden s
are failing us. a bill to expand the green cards allotted to foreign students in stem field, science, technology, engineering, mathematics, was voted down in congress. on a recent prime time special on cnn, "fixing immigration," i pointed out that canada and australia now have larger foreign-born populations than the united states. both of those countries revamped their immigration systems to attract and keep the best and brightest foreigners, but we're closing the door to many of the smartest potential entrepreneurs in the world. if we want job creators, let's stop kicking them out of the country. >>> when we come back, mahmoud ahmadinejad apologizes to new yorkers. more of my interview with the president of iran. ♪ so, i'm working on a cistern intake valve, and the guy hands me a locknut wrench. no way! i'm like, what is this, a drainpipe slipknot? wherever your business takes you, nobody keeps you on the road like progressive commercial auto. [ flo speaking japanese ] [ shouting in japanese ] we work wherever you work. now, that's progressive. call or click today. >>> president
on the global list of whether it's science or engineering or technology or whatever it may be. what has happened to the american dream that has allowed things to get so low in so many key areas. why is the rest of the world overtaking and what should be done about it? >> i think it's priorities and values and greed, really, and at the end of the day, it's greed and lack of leadership to the point why i don't see how it makes so much sense how we spend so much money on prisons versus education, and that doesn't make any sense to me at all. i don't see why we can't manufacture things in america. i don't -- i don't get it. >> i want to pitch in on manufacturing for just a second. one of the problems that we have with american manufacturing is we're an older manufacturing economy, and we areused to paper orders and contract processes and other things. if you go to china and have a network like ollie bubba. we know that we can move more into the internet age with our manufacturing in our bidding and ordering process. >> is china the enemy that many americans see it as or should it be a global trading
's science or engineers or whatever it may be. what has happened to the american dream that's allowed things to get so low. why is the rest of the world overtaking and what should be done about it? >> i think it's priorities and values and greed at the end of the day it's greed and lack of leadership tot point where i don't see why it makes sense that we spend so much money or prisons versus education. that doesn't make any sense to me at all. i don't see why we can't manufacture things in america. i don't get it. >> i want to pitch in on manufacturing for a second. >> one of the problems we have with american manufacture manuf we're older. we are used to paper and those types of things. china has natural sources electronically. we know one of the things we can do in america is move more in the internet age in our manufacturing and bidding and ordering process. >> is china the enemy as many people see it as or should it be a global trading partner. >> i think we live in a very diverse world and we need to embrace that. if china is excelling in something, that's great but guess what, america
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. c'mon0manp just do it,quick.ú no one's watchingp you0have to if you want to hang with0us ♪musicú the other one tooú good job >> welcome back. we continue with donald trump. i look at the world situation. you deal with the economy i look at the world burning in middle east and islamists and greece and spain and decline of the you euro. 16 trillion in debt. 6 trillion under obama alone. i am worried. i am really really worried about america and the future and lack of leadership at a very important time. what's your worst fear? >> i am worried also. that's one of the reasons i am so involved. i don't need to do this. i don't love doing it. you are a great friend and a friend of mine in the true sense. i would rather be doing other things right now. it's late. you work all day long. you come and shawn is going to interview. >> thanks a lot. >> the truth is or watching you because i always do. >> the truth is i am worried about this country. this country is going in the wr
want to see it as it moves from lax to the california science center. police warn they will close most sidewalks along the route for safety reasons. >>> new information about a san jose principal accused of not reporting allegations of sexual abuse by a teacher. the evergreen schoolteacher released notes showing a second grade student told principal that a teacher blindfolded her and put something in her mouth. now prosecutors say the principal should have reported that to the police and child protective services. the teacher allegedly molested another student three months later and was arrested. >>> 6:25. california's money problems are forcing more student tsz to go -- students to go to college out of state. uc and csu schools already pack the students from other states that pay more tuition here. they are cutting enrollment for california residents they is frustrating for those that would rather stay here in california. >> here in california tuition is going up every year every month. it's getting expensive. >> colleges in oregon, washington state, arizona, and ohio are aggressively
or oral medications until they determine the extent of it. >> kelly: the doctor is with the health science center and changed jobs and they're happy to have you down there. >> jamie: she's doing a ton of stuff. nice to have all of you with us today. i'm jamie colby, keep it here on the fox news chant. >> kelly: coming up next, the journal editor ral report. have a great day everybody. >> bye-bye. folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico sure are happy. i'd say happier than a slinky on an escalator. get happy. get geico. melons!!! oh yeah!! well that was uncalled for. folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico sure are happy. how happy, ronny? happier than gallagher at a farmers' market. get happy. get geico. but they have to use special care in keeping the denture clean. dentures are very different to real teeth. they're about 10 times softer and may have surface pores where bacteria can multiply. polident is designed to clean dentures daily. its unique micro-clean formula kills 99.9% of odor causing bacteria and helps dissolve stains, cleaning in a better way than
puts the technology in the hands of women themselves. abc7 health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >>> it's estimated 3,000 women around the world are infected with h.i.v. every day. a imagine of those cases are in sub sahara, africa. but now this team in menlo park are developing a gel they believe will cut those numbers dramatically. >> it's a two-part gel. when applied to the site, it will stick for such a long time, at the same time it is two drugs, one effective against hiv and the other effective. >> it is to protect women during intercourse from hiv and hsv, a form of genital herpes also rampant in africa. it would be an alternative in male-dominated cultures that sometimes discourage the use of condoms. >> therefore you want to empower the women to take charge of their own health. >> the project recently received a boost from the national institute of health. in july it awarded them a half million dollars grant to fund the research for two years. >> they believe the combination therapy could be particularly effective because hsv-2 infections leave women more vulne
the technology in the hands of women themselves. health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >>> it's estimated 3,000 women around the world are infected with h.i.v. every day. a imagine of those cases are in sub sahara, africa. but now this team in menlo park are developing a gel they believe will cut those numbers dramatically. >> it's a two-part gel. when applied to the site, it will stick for such a long time, at the same time it is two drugs, one effective against hiv and the other effective. >> it is to protect women during intercourse from hiv and hsv, a form of genital herpes also rampant in africa. it would be an alternative in male-dominated cultures that sometimes discourage the use of condoms. >> therefore you want to empower the women to take charge of their own health. >> the project recently received a boost from the national institute of health. in july it awarded them a half million dollars grant to fund the research for two years. >> they believe the combination therapy could be particularly effective because hsv-2 infections leave women more vulnerable to contract
, rational thought. the current party has waged a war in science. climate denial is horrifying. it's war on reason. you cited former vice president dick cheney that deficits do not matter. karl rove said it that we create our own realities. you live in it. a romney pollsters said we will not be restricted by fact checkers. i refer to a post-truth world. the problem is the policy oriented. the party has been captured by people like grover norquist who is a ferocious anti-tax ideologue who has forced many members of the house and senate to abide by his pledge of no tax increases. where do you get the revenue to help build the country? when people talk about the deficit -- it is not the deficit or debt but joblessness which is the great crisis of our times. the deficit and debt did not arrive from some inaccurate conception. -- immaculate conception. two unfunded wars, medicare part d. let them speak to that. mitt romney has it fantastical approach to arithmetic. at the bottom of it, there is a commitment and an ideology to insuring that the top 1% make out real well. those most vulnerable
the most government funded research to push the boundaries of science and technology so our best innovators and the entrepreneurs could pluck them and start these companies. if you think about that is a formula for success, and education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming out of high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers we are now $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration we have a policy to get a great education and then get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h-1b issues that are so vital for our future strength. fourth, the rules for incentivizing risk-taking and preventing recklessness. i don't think that we have in any way remedied that the way we want and on the government funded research if it looks like an ekg heading for a heart attack. i don't know if they are relative to what. all i know is in the things that have historically made us great, on each one of those i see us not g
on wednesday night. here's robert gibbs from meet the press. >> it is not rocket science to believe that the president was the disappointed in the expectations he has for himself. >> i think you are going to see a very engaged president that is ready and willing to call out whichever mitt romney shows up. >> reporter: at the same time, the romney campaign is wonder which president obama is going to show up? one said they fully expect the tough, chicago obama to be at the next debate. on the campaign trail, laying out some themes for the next one on one. >> every year, the median income in america's gone down, it's down $4300 a family and the average income of a family around $50,000, that hurts. gasoline prices are up twice what they used to be. these are tough years for the middle class and for the poor in america. >> reporter: of course, economic themes will play very largely into the debate a week from tuesday, as will foreign policy because they are opening up the format to that end, tomorrow at the lexington, virginia, governor romney with a big foreign policy speech. we will b
his dog and uses science to bring him back to life. and liam neeson comes back with revenge in the sequel to 2008's "taken." he takes on killers seeking revenge for a murder committed in the first film. you can see reviews for both movies at myfoxdc.com. >>> a any of the-year franchise still going strong. today marks five decades since james bond hit the big screen in the classic film "dr. no." sean connery filled the shoes in that first one. daniel craig now plays bond. he'll be back in theaters next month in "skyfall." it's the 23rd official film. >> amazing. >>> on this friday morning we have a lot for you still coming up. but coming up next, comedian and radio show host, tom papa -- >> papa. >> you got me all jacked up. >> i did it to you, sorry. papa is in town for a gig at the improve. is he smiling? he's still smiling. first he'll join us live instudio. >> will feel more like fall this weekend, so might be time for a world famous hay ride. good morning, sarah. >> reporter: good morning. we're at what seems to be the world famous cox farms this morning. and we are here
moderator. jenna: like him on that. gregg: let's recruit him. sounds like something out of science fiction but scientists say they developed medical devices that dissolve safely inside the body. we'll have that story coming up or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. jenna: some very interesting medical news for you. scientists say they have developed medical devices that do the work they're designed for on side your body and then, just dissolve. what happens to them? that is the question we have for dr. ernest patty, senior attending physician at st. barna bass hospital in the bronx. doctor, what are we talking about here? medical devices that dissolve, come on. >> small electronic devices. call them transient electronics made out of silicon and magnesium. they're covered in a silk cocoon. they use the silk because the silk is absorbed by the body as well as silicon and magnesium. jenna: what is scenario where someone may have a medical device you're describing? >> th
." brigid callahan harrison, professor of political science at state university. herb jackson, washington correspondent for the record hurt and my colligan chief clinical correspondent for njtv. we have questions reported earlier by the news director of wbgo-fm, doug doyle, which is seen throughout the broadcast. here's the rules throughout the debate. each candidate will have 90 seconds for an opening and closing statement in a show of 60 seconds to answer questions from our panel. then move onto the next question. there is a timing light here to keep us on schedule. it is my job to try and force that. the audience has promised once again to make my job a bit easier and show proper respect to the candidates by holding their applause until we have this broadcast. it conducted during the conversation during the broadcast come you can follow us on twitter using the hash tag and jay debate. let's begin. we tossed a coin. senator kyrillos goes first. kyrillos: mike, thank you very much and to njtv and montclair state for this debate. you know, i love this country. i love america. all of us ar
harrison, professor political science at my here at montclair state university. herb jackson, washington correspondent for the record. and my colleague, michael aron for njtv. we have questions reported earlier by the news director of wbgo-fm, doug doyle throughout the court pass. here are the rules. each candidate was 90 seconds for an opening and closing statement and each will have 60 seconds to answer questions for our panel. then we will build onto the next question. there is a title like that keeps us on schedule and it is my job to try to enforce a timing light. the audience has promised once again can make my job a bit easier and show proper respect to candidates by holding a pause until we end this broadcast. if you'd like to join the conversation during the broadcast, follow us on twitter using the hash tag mj debate. we tossed a coin. senator kyrillos goes first. your opening statement. kyrillos: mike, thank you very much. thank you to the record at montclair state and you senator menendez for this debate. you know, i love this country. i love america. all of us are blessed to
and science -- math and reading that, in fact, our minority students, our hispanic and african-american students with disabilitieses are doing better and the gap between them and the majority population is, in fact, closing. so, we are doing exactly the right thing. they're the ones who have been for the patriot act, then against it, for no child left behind, then against it. >> mr. vice president, our final -- i'm sorry. you have 30 seconds, senator edwards. >> yeah. he started. yeah. 30 seconds. yes. we are for accountability. and we are for high standards. john and i voted for no child left behind because we thought the accountability and standards were the right thing to do. did you figure out you were wrong? >> i did. >> in fairness, if you feel you need to go to him -- >> i do. because we're on the final question. i surprise for giving you 15 seconds. whichever one of you is elected in november, you mentioned the three electoral votes in wyoming and how critical they were, but you'll inherit a very deeply divided country economically, politically, you name it. how do you
the subjectivity out of it and you put science around it. so it gives you a benchmark for the products that you have. so when we start looking at that, what we did was we said okay, what are some other alternatives? how can we horne into this as -- honey into this -- hone into this aspect of this particular product. we looked at things from the food industry, for instance. when we did that we came up with the clean stem fluid which is sourced as you said entirely from the fluid industry. what that did by developing those right off the bat, we had two or three orders magnitude stepdown in the numbers. >> numbers of what? >> it's a relative ranking. if you look at one product just in round numbers, let's say it's got an 800, which is what we have been using, some are down to 300 this. >> in terms of what? >> the effects of health, safety and environmental standpoint. >> researching and developing the new recipes for fracking is very expensive. tens of millions of dollars i imagine. >> yes, sir. >> the company believes the existing process, the ones they have been using for years is safe. why is h
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. for the first time since it went public google he is amarket value now eclipses that of microsoft. when you take a look at the ten years for the two stocks you will see much of it made up by the fact that, yeah, google has gone up and microsoft has not. or not much beyond that 27.9% that we're talking about. google's move recently of course has been the reason the why it is around 248, 249 and a little weak today on down grade but interesting to note the fortunes of both of thoses in terms of google's appreciation and what it is in a larger market value company. >>s interesting to think when facebook was going public people would think facebook google, google being the old guard of tech and facebook being the new guard and wonder field goal that would also happen wz very seen with google and microsoft and so far we have not. >> seems that google won the mobile war. >> in the meantime might want to take a look at gold today, the highest level since november, not just
to push the boundaries of science and technology so are innovators and entrepreneurs can start these companies. to think about that as a form of success, in education, roughly 30% of high-school students drop out. we used to leave the world in high school graduates. we no longer. on infrastructure, we are $2 trillion in the deficit in terms of the infrastructure. on immigration, we have a policy where we give you a great education and then get the hell out. 1b're still fighting simple h visa issues. i do not think we have in any way remedied this. on government-funded research, it looks like any cagy headed to -- ekg heading to a heart attack. on each one of those indices that has made as great, i see is not going in the direction that we should be. for me, that is the alarm bell and the peptalk have been trying to put forth. >> i will ask the same question to you. are we a strong as we have ever been or are there ways you see a measurable in meaningful decline? >> to me, it's obvious we're not as strong as we have ever been for the reasons that tom has just enumerated but also
this is such an inexact science. not just this month. it's nonsense. they have to figure out a more accurate way. >> the headline though is "good news for the president." absolutely. >> the headline is huge political news for the president. >> we'll be right back with what we learned. you paid...wow. hmmm. let's see if walmart can help you find the same look for less. okay. see? walmart has all these leading eyewear brands and styles. rockstar! really? yeah. oh, wow! oh, black frame looks good on you. yeah? you can get a complete pair starting at just -- $38. really?! and did you know that our glasses come with a free 12-month replacement guarantee? i didn't know walmart had all this. the price is impressive, the quality is too! come to walmart and see for yourself. find quality eyewear brands starting at just $38. only at walmart. what are they fitting, aliens? check out the latest collection of snacks from lean cuisine. creamy spinach artichoke dip, crispy garlic chicken spring rolls. they're this season's must-have accessory. lean cuisine. be culinary chic. check out the latest collection of
to actually do something that will be good for patients and good for science going forward so this is the one thing that didn't make it. the other little thick that didn't make it is now the safe dosage act, passed in the last minute, by the senate, and that's awaiting the president's signature, but one of the things that's necessary in terms of the resources is that this has to be a global enterprise. one of the things that is happening globally is the leading pharmaceutical companies in the united states, in europe, in japan have banded together to work with interpol to ensure they have enough resources to go after the bad guys around the world, and we've just started that. i think we're going to kick that off here next month. we've been discussing this with interpol, and we think we have a good program to help country's specific enforcement agencies with the global respective of interpol. yes, it costs money. it is money well spent, but more importantly, it gets us the heart of the trust that patients have to have in our medicines. >> ralph, i know as we've worked on the partnership and bu
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)